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Reflecting Thought

  There is often little time for reflection though the hours never cease to pile up.  Much is thought of, many things are remembered, but little is reflected upon.  There is a difference between thinking and reflecting; one of them presents a plan or an image, which is transformed according to feeling, or exterior phenomena that seeks an end, or a means to an end; the other is the transformation of thought without end, it simply looks, it watches the worry come and go, plans arise and finish.  When you step back from a wall, you can see how high it is, but when you are very close, you must grasp onto something because there is no way to see where you are.  So reflecting is a way to stand back and see how far the thought goes, while thinking holds to the thought as long as it wants.  Reflection shows that thoughts do not control you, while thinking always seeks a thought to control. Douglas Thornton

Hearing With The Eyes, Seeing With The Ears

  Hearing With The Eyes, Seeing With The Ears The more eloquently we are able to describe an idea, the more truthful our feelings become; the more truthfully we convey this to someone else, the more we find meaning in it.  There is the story of two people walking in the mountains, and as one of them was taken up with the amazing scenery, commenting on all the views that he saw, and the sensations these views inspired in him, he noticed his friend ever silent, walking along with head down, only furtively looking up from time to time.  Exasperated, the friend finally says to him, 'But you haven't even looked at any of these beautiful sights!  Are you not touched by these mountains?'  Whereon the friend replied, 'Yes I am, but it is a shame to try and speak about them.'  The truth lies behind the thing we think most evident; it makes it as far as the eyes and vanishes with an echo in the ears; half a sentence is sometimes too much or a whole page not enough.  In the en

Transformative Light

Transformative Light Today, Tuesday, sun all day; feel the days getting longer.  The slightest variation in light is perceptible only by the way in which it hits certain objects.  With the eye, we may notice morning, evening, and noon, by taking into account the incline of the sun, but as for our earth moving in its orbit and the light growing longer or brighter on the hills or the walls of our homes, that feeling and that change is lost unless we take minute observation of our daily surroundings.  Light, by contrast, is a transformation of the understanding of the inexplicable; it enlightens but does not clarify our perceptions, and even though it is to make the day longer, it is not a privilege granted for our comfort.  Though the object may help us see, it makes us turn our backs to that which we really want to know, and so the languor and discomfort of these ever-widening days is a burden and something careful to be shrugged off. Douglas Thornton

The Cycle Of Being

  The Cycle Of Being Focus to lassitude; Lassitude to indifference; Indifference to disassociation; Disassociation to unfulfillment. When we arrive at the end of this cycle, regeneration begins. Unfulfillment must turn into something; it cannot, according to present thinking, remain stable.  When there is a difficulty, we look at the details, and these give off a feeling of knowing something greater, and so the intention to go forward, but they also keep us from knowing that something greater, and so our intention to fall back into comfort.  It is often through this that the idea of conquering comes forth; every activity, feeling, attachment, must be overcome.  There is always the idea to solve something, to become better, but these are the details that lead us through the above cycle.  There is no end to anything except what can be stabilized in the mind, and without this it is just going through the motions, awaiting the highs and the lows, excitement and boredom, the foolish and the

A Poet's Journal: April 30th, 2015

  April 30th, 2015 It is easy to think that books are worthy for the knowledge they impart, but there is something even greater.  The moment we realize that they have been with us for many years, hidden in the background, a silent companion to our inward movements, and in one instant come forth to charm us or engage us in an old friendship, it is right then, the moment of that first meeting, that we hold in highest regard.  We know not of our joys or our misgivings until they find unique expression; in books there is a place for our troubles, and a word for our vision. It helps us look back at the places we've been and whom we've seen, giving perspective, never harsh or unneeded, but always with the glow of a distant light and an unerring respect.  And finally, when the book no longer serves its purpose, but has introduced us to something much deeper within ourselves, we can shrug off and get rid of our attachment, and turn to what remains unwritten. Douglas Thornton

A Poet's Journal: April 24th, 2015

  April 24th, 2015 It does not matter how much we see the world because there is always something to it that is not exactly attainable.  A wild landscape, a colorful bug, an unexpected stray dog, they hide behind a meaning that we search for, and whether we find it or not, we accept them into our experience as having given us some insight.  Our opinion and our reconciliation with this opinion is the only way happiness is thought to be had.  When the wild landscape is no longer wild, it does not grieve, but our spirit is conquered by the fact. When our happiness is no longer so, the stray dog is a pitiful creature; thus we create the stories that keep us in the world we live in.  But if there is a world outside of this, where do we look, and do we want to see something that is devoid of our sentiment?  If we hold the rope too long our hands will blister, but if we let go, the rope will no longer be there to save us.  Some may ask why they are holding the rope in the first place, and som