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Showing posts from August, 2021

Unpublished Poetry Series: The Field-Watcher

  The Field-Watcher When in the shadows of the passing day A seat is found, asleep in calm Soundness, as activity of the mind Cease, and the slow and wavy dreams Of reality vanish by timeless Art, he who observes the secrets Of the fast-forgotten world finds purpose Insensible to sleep, remnant Of future life.  The fullness of the stars Softly infuse the distant sky With rays of obscure light, the horizon Ever holds the dawn in glimmer. Douglas Thornton 2018

A Poet's Journal: February 24th, 2015

  February 24th, 2015 The question of effort always comes up.  Am I doing enough?  Am I doing it the right way?  Is this really how it should be?  It is easier to question than to do and even doing wrongly is most of the time better than doubting uselessly.  We often rely upon hesitancy to fulfill the effort required because we do not feel ourselves up to the task, or the time does not feel right.  Our projects and our plans gather strength the further they remain in the future; the closer they come to completion, the more apt they are to failure.  'Failure occurs near the end,' says Lao-Tzu because our effort has created something that was different from the beginning; we perceive the two differently so they must be acted upon differently.  Something the ancient poets used to speak of at the beginning of their poems, and even the Tibetan sages in their poems and prayers to theirs gurus, was a muse awakening, or the idea of something finding a bit of realization in something un